CONTENTS

September-October 2018 | Volume 14 Number 5

WHAT’S IN THIS ISSUE

Lineup: September-October

  1. Karen Lethlean/An Ironman’s Story
  2. Barbara Rosenthal/A Crack in the Sidewalk
  3. Michael Goldstein/Album Art
  4. Fred Roberts/Visit to the Old Country, Music
  5. Fred Roberts/Poland Playist
  6. Maria Gillan/Poetry
  7. Ben White/Ocean Ghosts
  8. Steve Poleskie/Then & Now
  9. William Crawford/Flash Photo
  10. Jean-Paul Gavard-Perret/On Location, France
  11. T.R. Hummer/Poetry
  12. Sherrie Harvey/Bermuda Triangle
  13. Lyn Lifshin/Poetry
  14. Rich Ives/Nonfiction
  15. Ewa Mazierska/Scarves of Candolim
  16. Jim Feast/Book Review, Thad Rutkowski
  17. Michael T. Young/Poetry
  18. Jean E. Verthein/Fiction
  19. Ed Coffey/Why I Run
  20. Suchita Bhhatia/Filmmaker Frustrations
  21. Tom Kay/”Holy Shit: Computer Oral Art”
  22. Jose Rodeiro/”NoWall@All”
  23. Jessica Noyes McEntee/”Can You Say Capitalism?”
  24. Joe Giordano/”At the Cemetery”

 




 

Editor’s Note

 

Media Whores

 

What gets me more than anything else about television these days is the way commercial stations, networks and media conglomerates punish the viewing public with unchecked lies and accusations that pour forth in practically every advertisement from either side of the political spectrum. I mean, this is the clearest example of what filthy lucre can do to a wobbly republic, and it’s just not suitable for organizations calling themselves objective and unbiased to allow of others, let alone themselves. If reporters were to fact-check spurious allegations that appear in advertisements the way they supposedly investigate and fact-check stories they broadcast, there would certainly be a decline in the much-anticipated revenue streams that accompany, if not promote, election frenzy. But at least the common woman and man over 18, the voter, would be armed with a semblance of Real Knowledge to take with them to the polls.

What to do about it? In the face of the hundreds of millions of dollars streaming into the corporate media coffers, that’s going to be a hard one to sell — unless the government steps in to regulate an industry – and a nation — that seems to thrive on episodic untruth. Corporations (“persons” in the eyes of the law) are highly unlikely to self-regulate without public outcry and an assist from taxpayer-sponsored public-service announcements, such as led to a decrease in smoking, use of seat belts, and other steps toward a more sane and healthy America. (So much for Net Neutrality, but that’s another enema enigma.)

Critics will charge the government has no right to step in, to limit the right to free speech, but that’s hogwash. The same argument was used when laws were passed to cut down on highway deaths by forcing automobile manufacturers to include seat belts in cars, to enact laws restricting use of handheld electronic devices while driving, to restrict smoking on airplanes (yes, remember those days?), or to disallow hate speech. There’s no reason in the world not to explore ways to help ensure that the crap being fed the American Public becomes a critical thinking person’s delight, and not a continuing diet of prevarication to fatten up the misguided who believe anything they see and hear on their scream screens.

If the Media Whores won’t get off EasyStreet on their own and start demanding of advertisers that what they put up is a fair and honest recapitulation of Fact, we the people need to do something about it. The vicious and misleading political ads being peddled as Truth are indeed what our liar-in-chief calls Fake News, while the real news gets swept under the carpet of boredom as viewers hear in their brains the silent scream of “Enough! Enough!”, mentally and intellectually shutting down before falling asleep with nightmares of squabbling adolescents populating their dreams.

We’ve been punished long enough. Now, to do something about it. “Like what?”, you ask? Perhaps by contacting local politicians and broadcast news organizations; ask them to forego the quick buck in favor of helping to restore the dignity and regain the honor that goes with Good Government, to kill the cancer eating away at the core values of our Republic (including the inherent value of a free press) in a most laughable and globally embarrassing way. It’s making cynics of too many.

 

Thanks for reading, and for spreading the word.
Mike Foldes, Founder/Managing Editor
See you next time.




The Future of Art/Jane Kallir

Modernism is inseparable from the rise of the Western middle class. In nineteenth-century Europe, the bourgeoisie created a vast new market for art, previously a luxury enjoyed mainly by aristocrats. Cities, especially, became cultural hubs replete with museums, galleries, concert halls, theaters and publishing houses. The direct patronage that had characterized the aristocratic age was replaced by a wider distribution system that depended on intermediaries to connect artists with consumers.

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NoWall@All

NEO-LATINO#NOWALL@ALL       Neo-Latino Artists exhibit at ArtSpace 88 Gallery   by  José Rodeiro n the eve of National Hispanic Heritage month, celebrating US-Latino culture and ethnicity, Art Space 88...

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Jessica Noyes McEntee/Fiction

  Can You Say Capitalism?   by Jessica Noyes McEntee  Contributing Writer Papa always said, “Princesses have princes to come to their rescue, but you have me. And Donovan, in a pinch—he’s on the payroll for that.” An unsentimental sort, he never followed up with a...

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Joe Giordano/Fiction

At the Cemetery by Joe Giordano Contributing Writer   "Who died?" Craig’s eyes rose. They were brown like a Basset Hound. "What? Oh, Frank, you surprised me." If we weren’t on the beach, or under the boardwalk with a chick, the guys hung out at Conor’s Irish Pub a...

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Maria Mazziotti Gillan/Poetry

So Many Things I Wish I Had Done So many things I wish I had done, so many things I wish I had said, all those words that could have comforted but that I withheld, so now even so many years after my father’s death I wish I could call him back from inside the mausoleum...

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On Location/France

      Cayo Scheyven : liberté et amour (Cayo Scheyven : freedom and love)   by Jean-Paul Gavard PerretContributing Columnist Cayo Scheyven est une artiste d’origine néeralandaise. Elle est le parfait exemple d’une artiste libre qui se moque des convenances. Son...

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Then & Now, Stephen Poleskie

ur turn came and we shuffled our bikes up to the starting line. My eyes should have been on my own set of lights, but I couldn’t help looking over at the Hustler’s “Christmas tree.” He got the green and took off. My eyes flashed over at my own set and, after what seemed like a long time, I got green. I took off. Glancing up I could see the Hustler, which appeared to be half way down the ¼ mile track. But I was gaining on him. I ran my tach to red line in each gear. I was right on the Hustler’s tail. I risked a glance up at the finish line. And then I was passing him. I held on and crossed the line first.

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William Crawford/Flash Photo

    Crawdaddy Conjures Up A Mostly Forgotten  Japanese Pop Star, Aku Sakamoto,  To Break International Tension On The Golden Gate.   by William Crawford Contributor immy Pro runs a tight ship at OZQUEST. His...

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T.R. Hummer/Poetry

What’s the matter with the old musicians
   of Kansas City? From here they look
Like planets exploded in the prairie wind.
   That’s why the sunset swings
So hard, distant and bright and bloody.

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Barbara Rosenthal/A Crack in the Sidewalk

Commissioning an actual Work of Art, however, is a corrupt and oxymoronic notion altogether because a commissioned idea doesn’t originate with the artist. Artists must resist all outside demands for a new creation. Artists should resist offering patrons work anything other than those they previously generated their own ideas for and which is already in inventory or fully or nearly complete. No exhibitions should be scheduled for nonexistent work.

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Ocean Ghosts/Ben White

And I was haunted.  All the way across the ocean on the way to Tokyo to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Japanese Coast Guard, I was haunted by the sea, the stories, the history, the unknown, the traditions, the journey. The haunting itself is a ghost.

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Lyn Lifshin/Four Poems of Aleppo

LIFE IN ALEPPO a day without bombs, is good. You can leave your apart- ment, wander thru small oasis of color and light. No words, only the sense of loss. No color except for an plot of green and one plum tree, not turned to drift wood. One man who has not left, says...

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Ewa Mazierska/Travel

    The Scarves from Candolim   by Ewa Mazierska Contributing Writer rom my holiday in Candolim in India I brought home fifteen scarves. They were sold to me by Lisa, a beach vendor, working on a strip of...

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Jim Feast/Book Review

          border crossings by Thaddeus RutkowskiPaperback, 6"x9"96 pagesSensitive Skin BooksISBN: 978-1977850898$12.95   by Jim Feast There is a poem called “Border Crossings” in a new book of the same name by Thaddeus Rutkowski. It’s a theme picked up in other verses...

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Michael T. Young/Poetry

     Dredging Gulls tow my gaze out beyond the breakwaters and jetties, to coast there among the glass towers. Wind whips the water in me into waves and spindrift. Along all my shores are hardnesses broken down into sand, fragments supposed to equal the history of me....

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Fiction/Jean E. Verthein

      Plie, Adjust, Tundu, Tap   by Jean E. Verthein Contributing Writer Three in the morning. The phone rang. It did, didn’t it? After all, detectives called for midnight lineups to check whether the attacker from six months earlier was there. But the end of the line...

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Suchita Bhhatia/On Filmmaking in India

  Reaching the Door     by Suchita Bhhatia Contributing Writer Last night a filmmaker friend of mine informed me that he was contemplating suicide. No, he hasn't killed himself yet! And no, this is not a joke. There have been incidents of drunk driving and crashing...

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Tom Zatar Kay/Holy Shit: A 3-hour Poem

ZATARS-COMPUTER-VOICE-3-AND-A-HALF-HOUR-POEM "Holy Shit" Metaphysical Poetry Readings prose monologues euphony BOOMING onomatopoeia Computer Oral Art. Excerpted from the book "Holy Shit" By Tom ZataR Kay. "Human Robot Poetry" When my words are spoken by a computer...

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Ed Coffey/Essay

Why Do I Race? by Ed CoffeyContributing Writer  ran for 10 years before I ever even knew that ordinary people raced. I thought that racing was for elite or, at least, very talented runners. The people I saw...

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Fred Roberts/Poland Playlist

  by Fred Roberts Music Editor   Category: The Polish Falco Song Title: Nie poddawaj się Artist: Kombi Year: 1983 Link: https://youtu.be/l9g7d2f6L10 Category: Rocking sixties ladies Song Title: Motyle Artist: Amazonki Year: 1969 Link: https://youtu.be/prG8tfK4sIU...

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Mark Walker/Creative Nonfiction

  My Life in the Land of the Eternal Spring: The Coffee Plantation   By Mark D. Walker Contributor hough I had lived and worked in Guatemala for seven years, it was a brief encounter with my young daughter,...

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Stéphane Vereecken \ Photographer Interview

Q: When did you first realize you had creative talents as a artist?

A: I started at a very young age to no longer take Fine Arts courses and I digested all those artists who are part of the history of the Fine Arts. When I realized that one medium was not enough for me and that I needed to experience them all, I realized that I needed to say things with my art…

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Ohio Jazz Shorts/Candice Watkins

  Melvin James “Sy” Oliver: Creator of the Lunceford Sound (1910–1988), & Zach Whyte   by Candice Watkins Contributing Writer ach Whyte attended Wilberforce College in the early 1920s, where he was an early...

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William Crawford/Flash Fiction

  “It’s like a heat wave…”    A Kool, Kool Fool From The Rock ‘N Roll School Shares A Frigidaire Nightmare.   pulled into El Paso along about half past dead. The weathered wall thermometer hit 99 in the red!...

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Sue Atkinson/Old Schools, Part 2

Populism nowadays is equated in popular media with bigotry and intolerance, but in the late 19th century, the populist movement represented rural residents’ desire to shape national policy that attended to the interests of producers as well as commercial interests. After losing the battle over monetary policy, the movement dwindled, the Democratic Party turned to corporate liberalism, and farmers’ interests were abandoned.

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Steve Dalachinsky/Poetry

the stone age   i’m lost - they’ve knocked me back to the stone age - this sick skin in a dream populated by science fiction literates - this terribly lonely dream populated by people into their own heads - gin drinkers & young girls sitting around 4 legged bathtubs...

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Adele Kenny/Poetry

2 Poems by Adele Kenny   Past the Waterline (After Lake with Dead Trees by Thomas Cole) This could be any day, anywhere—either one of us could be the other, momentary deer where the water ends and the forest begins. Whatever hard things we’ve seen—what we’ve fallen...

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Fiction/Leslie Brown

  WALKABOUT   by Leslie Brown In the summer of 1969 I told my mother II was going to sublet an apartment in the Cass Corridor. I’d always wanted to live near campus, and this was my last chance, my final quarter of graduate school at Wayne State University. Mama...

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Nancy Barno Reynolds/Education

ROSS FINDON PHOTO/ Unsplash   Those Who Can, Teach: Transitioning Through Education   by Nancy Barno Reynolds Education Editor tell people I’ve been teaching for 30 years and deep down, I feel that’s my...

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Teen Pregnancy: A Nurse’s Perspective

School officials are aware of, and knowledgeable about, requirements such as those delineated by Title IX.  These requirements promote inclusiveness and help prevent discrimination – and are intended to make it less likely that a pregnant teen will drop out of school.  Why then does the trend of drop-out teen mothers persist? Why, when we know that success in life is heavily predicated on educational attainment, do I continue to have conversations like the one above?

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Playlist for Donald Trump

  TAKE TEN Category: Cheerful world invasion videos Song Title: Гуманоид (Humanioid) Artist: ГрУпА СиТрО (Group Sitro) Year: 2007 Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMkILFgEfVM Category: Songs to tango with Melania Song Title: Комарик (Mosquito) Artist: Пётр...

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Jim Palombo/Politics

Every so often the crap hits the fan. I mean it’s in the scope of my work to pay attention to and analyze a lot of what’s on our public discussion table. But with all that’s happening, with so many battle lines being drawn, there seems too much to contend with…

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Mark Levy/Casual Observer

How about this one? You can risk sudden or severe changes in mood or behavior, like feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, hyperactive, overly excited, or even suicidal, in an effort to treat what ailment? Ironically, it’s depression, and Paxil and Wellbutrin are the medications. So if you are depressed, these medications can solve your problems by provoking suicide. Logical, I think, but extreme.

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Fred’s February Playlist

Frank Nagel photo Mary Ocher, with Felix Kubin, one of Fred's February picks....   TAKE TEN     Category: Forgotten Brazilian Guitarists Song Title: Amor de Argentina Artist: Américo Jacomino Year: 1928 Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4weR4B4heQ...

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On Location/France

Andelu painter in Vallauris: When reality flies   by Jean-Paul Gavard-Perret Contributing Editor ith Andelu the space of the  the picture is decomposed as blown by a contagious  sphere of influence. The...

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Education/Nancy Barno Reynolds

Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash   Critical Literacy, Economic Growth, and the Standards Movement: Are We Speaking the Same Language?   by Nancy Barno Reynolds Education Editor he introduction of ESSA...

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Julie McCarthy/Education

Photo by Bill Wegener on Unsplash *** Uncertain Times for Diverse Learners   by Julie McCarthy couple of years ago at a New York State conference for teachers of speakers of other languages, we were told...

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Monique Gagnon German/Poetry

  Yoga: Just Follow Instructions Yoga is the blocking of mental modifications so that the seer re-identifies with the Self.  – Sage Patanjali Inhale chest arms up, Don’t think about the phone call arms down exhale, bend forward into ragdoll, the tin plane you have to...

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Meredith Cottle/Poetry

Arrhythmic Morality perhaps I was the devil all along a crumbling and shameless little fool pleading to malicious cards of chance among the dying and their reverence that you should go, my benediction stands, as you have ceased to love or ever thrive, and I have...

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Belfast Snaps by Allen Forrest

***     About Allen Forrest: Cartoonist/Illustrator. Born in Canada and bred in the U.S., Allen Forrest has worked in many mediums: computer graphics, theater, digital music, film, video, drawing and painting. You can read more about him in About Us....

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Scott Thomas Outlar/Poetry

  Center of Your Silken Den Your couch was made of velvet. Supple to the touch. I didn’t notice as my defenses went soft. Waking up, I felt the marks left by your claws. Your teeth were sharp as needles. Subtle with their sting. I should have known the invitation...

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Politics/Jim Palombo

At the core of the situation lies a simple matter of fact. We do not have clarity when it comes to our own ideological frame; in essence, we cannot easily distinguish our capitalist and democratic selves.  In this context we have never seriously engaged our citizenry in developing a critical understanding of who we are in the mix of how capitalism’s inherent elements rub-up against the principles of democracy. After all, how much time have we spent exploring the cultural instincts that have developed in the most advanced capitalist system in the world?  In other words, how have the elements of materialism, aggression, competiveness, consumption/consumerism, individualism, survival of the fittest and the overall profit motive been examined in term of our everyday existence? Furthermore, how do these same elements play out against the ideals of fairness, equality, justice and liberty that we seem to also hold dear?  And can the deep-rooted issues we are facing — war and terrorism, racial and/or gender differences, class inequality, moral/ethical behavior, politically corruption, the ineptness of our institutions, health and welfare, and even our own individual shortcomings — be adequately confronted without a realistic assessment of our capitalist and democratic character?

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Alex Wolkowicz Review/Carl Oprey

  Alex Wolkowicz:  Viscera          Artbreak Gallery New York   by Carl Oprey Contributing Arts Editor arlier this year I went to two illuminating exhibitions within a few weeks of each other. One was the...

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Henry A. Giroux/Commentary

    Gangster capitalism and nostalgic authoritarianism in Trump’s America   In one year, the Trump regime has wrought immense damage to democracy, culture and thought. But there’s new hope.   by Henry A. Giroux Contributing Editor Just one year into the Donald Trump...

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Greg Stewart – On Location/New York

Currently the circulation of Esopus is about 30,000, with readers in all 50 states and 23 countries. The very loyal base of subscribers is about 2,000. The consistent success of Esopus has been its ability to provide the readership with an eclectic mix of art, as well as the good publicity that has been following it since its early editions. It has been reviewed in The New York Times, along with many international publications which have spread it around the globe.

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Jim Palombo/Politics

“… we have an education system that seems most focused on verifying its own worth, making it ‘too busy’ to be concerned with developing ongoing, civic dialogue. (Especially in these turbulent political times, this should be a top priority, at least on par with developing technological skills.)”

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Pierre-Jean Amar / Photography Interview

My photography work recently published in L’Oeil de la Photographie is part of an older series, which I once created on the theme of “Sheet” (as in bed linens) and the body. Similar to many of my images, I show only details, not a whole body. In hindsight, I notice today that quite often I focused on the bottoms of my models!!!

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LOCAL HEROES, 2015, Hamburg

Axid Rain was my highlight of the 4th semi-final night. They call their genre flatrock, which I attempted to google but finally gave up. They’re a hard rock band, in the classic vein of MTV or Huey Lewis and the News, with a fantastic live show. Frontman Yannick Mense, in his leather hat and seaman’s jacket was all over the stage. Pure charisma and wild guitar riffs. All in all an electrifying performance.

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RUNNING WILD

Running Wild is as of 9-17-18 a new column/blog designed to let you know who's doing (variously) what, when and where... leaving the "Why?" for you to figure out.... if it matters.     Posted  9/17/18          ...

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    March 10 @ 10:00 am - September 26 @ 6:00 pm
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History…

The name Ragazine was coined in the mid-’70s in Columbus, Ohio, as the title of an alternative newspaper/magazine put together by a group of friends. It was revived in 2004 as ragazine.cc, the on-line magazine of arts, information and entertainment, a collaboration of artists, writers, poets, photographers, travelers and interested others. And that’s what it still is.

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