CONTENTS

July-August 2018 | Volume 14 Number 4

 

Editor’s Note

 

REQUIRED READING

 

“If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself.”

— “The Federalist”, Essays by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison

 

What for many decades set America apart from the rest of the world were its professed beliefs, inscribed in The Constitution of the United States, in the power of government to conduct affairs of man and state with relentless scrutiny, to defend itself and others against the barbaric and the unscrupulous. Unfortunately, human nature and its inherent failings too often overtook what were the higher intentions of the Founding Fathers, even amongst whom many of those failings were evident. As much as it was – and is – a framework for an idealistic, almost Utopian way of life, the document is nothing more than a wilting leaf if the people it’s meant to deliver from tyranny fail to live up to its stated goals; as George Washington said in his address to Constitutional Convention delegates: “Let us raise a standard to which the wise and honest can repair…”

It seems the nation today has withdrawn from striving toward the highest ideals for and upon which it was founded. Some may say we’re still living in the freest society in the world, but in saying so, they fail to acknowledge how much lower the bar has been set by the present administration. How much a sense of optimism has been diminished from just two years ago; how much trust has been carved from the stone of international relations that took decades, if not centuries, to design, develop and enact. How much less likely we as Americans are to lead the world community in a direction that will benefit more, rather than fewer, of our fellow travelers.

While that intention dissipates, what fills the vacuum is braggadocio, isolationism, a grab for power seemingly now with an aim to build a triumvirate of Russia, China and the USA as a newborn Axis of Power. The spheres of influence of each of these three countries includes a newfound friend, North Korea, whose antagonisms are neutralized by an intensifying relationship with China that overflows with ulterior motives – on both sides.

Unfortunately, the so-called opposition is not stepping up to thwart this undermining of The American Way. Talk is one thing, action is another. The Constitution allows for removal of tyrants, yet we allow the manhandling of government to go on, rationalizing that voters allowed a manhandler of women and prevaricator extraordinaire to lead us to the next level, so to speak, wherever that may be, and so we must patiently wait “for the mid-terms” to force a change. This race to an ethical and moral bottom must not be allowed to persist.

To quote Washington once more: “The power under the Constitution will always be in the people. It is entrusted for certain defined purposes, and for a certain limited period, to representatives of their own choosing; and whenever it is executed contrary to their interest, or not agreeable to their wishes, their servants can and undoubtedly will be recalled.”

It is incumbent upon all of us, Americans and Global Citizens alike, to take a few minutes on this Global Independence Day in what could become a Global Independence Month, to find a copy of the Constitution and give it a few minutes of your time. It’s time to Act.

For just a buck, you can get one here.

 

Thanks for reading, and for spreading the word.
Mike Foldes, Founder/Managing Editor
See you next time.




William Wolak/New Work

  Take a walk with us through the psycho-sexual forest in William Wolak's World of Collage   I make collages out of all kinds of materials.  Most are made out of paper engravings. Many collages are digitally generated or enhanced.  To begin a piece, I select some...

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Brendan Brady/Poetry

The Snow in March is Tired Powdered abstractions in an opaque vanity, sickly snow perspires and gasps, engorged and sinking into sleep. A lullaby swallowed is wasted under evening daffodil while streetlights seize, blinking and confused. The power flashed and the...

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On Location/France

  Jan Fabre : jardins des délices er rebuffades   Jan Favre, « Folklore Sexuel Belge » et « Mer du Nord Sexuelle Belge » Galerie Templon, Grenier Saint Lazare Paris, France du 17 mai au 21 juillet 2018 Jan Fabre a est un artiste iconoclaste d’exception. Il a gardé de...

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Evan Lockwood/Commentary

  Epiphany in a Pizza Shop A Trumpian Reverie   By Evan Lockwood Illegally stoned on a plant not federally legal yet, in line at a pizza shop on a Friday night. The line is uncomfortably long for being this stoned. A young girl – clearly the daughter of an employee –...

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Judith Skillman/RD Armstrong Review

      Orphaned Words: Forgotten Poems from a Haphazard Life by RD Armstrong $20.00 USD + shipping, 246 pp   A Review by Judith Skillman In RD Armstrong’s Orphaned Words, we find a rare honesty, beginning with the poet’s forward: “If it weren’t for LUMMOX Press, I’d be...

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Fabia Wong/In search of…

In tandem with these reductions in timeframes, the law proposes to double the permissible period to detain an individual whose claim for asylum has been rejected. This measure is only undertaken where the person presents a flight risk. According to the case law of the European Court of Human Rights, states are authorized to detain aliens to prevent unlawful immigration if there are appropriate safeguards and if there is a judicial decision authorizing the detention.  By extending the period, the government has effectively bought itself more time before such detention is considered “illegal”. 

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Edmond Dalpe/Altamira: A Satire

*** ILL-0: PLF, (Programmed Life Forms (academics)). Dalpe © 2018   Breve: An epistemological satire from the Stone-Age to the present day characterized as a riposte to the one bad-guy that every creative type loves to hate, an academic (PLF)! When the dust finally...

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Stephen Poleskie/Then and Now

    Leaving Moscow?   By Stephen Poleskie  Contributing Columnist   “Just fill out this form and you can go. . . .” Jenya said, sliding a paper in front of me. “But it’s in Russian, I can’t read Russia,” I replied. “We know you can read it,” Jenya answered, giving me...

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Mark Walker/Creative Nonfiction

  My Life in the Land of the Eternal Spring: The Coffee Plantation   By Mark D. Walker Contributor hough I had lived and worked in Guatemala for seven years, it was a brief encounter with my young daughter,...

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Braised Bourdain/by Jim Palombo

In applying Durkheim’s thoughts as to our own norms and values, functions and dysfunctions, as well as the nature of our societal balance,  one might begin by examining how the principles of democracy — think justice, fairness, equality, etc. get mixed with the practicalities of capitalism — think competition, material success, consumerism, etc. In this light it’s fair to ask to what extent these principles and practicalities can co-exist, how their interpretations might conflict with each other and what type imbalance might be evident in terms of overall societal objectives? In addition, a look into how our cultural instincts (tendencies that become part of our behaviors over time) get framed – think of these instincts in relationship to how generations were affected by their particular set of societal variables, especially in eras like the industrial and technological revolutions. In this regard, and in similar context, we would also have to consider our contemporary social concerns – think of work/labor problems, changing family dynamics, the environment, racial and gender issues, and even war and peace. 

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Cammy Pedroja/3 Poems

The Invisible Man   By the window, on a black bone chair the germs leave your body through smoke. Can two tandem blankly to bash out a cure? I have read that drones die in the act of mating. Honey-stomachs busting in the rub of it. The longtime residents warned me,...

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Emily Carney Reviews Elizabeth Cohen

  Against the Ache: Elizabeth Cohen’s The Patron Saint of Cauliflower   By Emily Carney Contributing Reviewer “I’m preparing for the end of the world / again,” writes Elizabeth Cohen, “which is to say I am making / goulash.” This is how Cohen introduces The Patron...

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The Drunkards/Book Review

“The Drunkards” by L.M. Rivera Omnidawn Publishing Copyright 2018 ISBN 1632430541, 9781632430540 144 Pages $11.93 Review by Emily Vogel L.M. Rivera’s new collection of poetry, “The Drunkards” is first of all predicated upon and associated with numerous notions and...

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Aleksi Glick/Interview

    Snack Cat: Jazz you like it A musical collective    An e-interview with Aleksi Glick by Mike Foldes Ragazine: Who are members of the collective? Glick: Below are the members of Snack Cat with the instrument they play. Aleksi Glick- lead guitar/ vocals Jeff Koch-...

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Summer Sun Fun Zehn

  Ten Top Tunes for Summer Listening   For music-loving polyglots, this is a summer listening list for you. Everyone else -- steer clear of falling stars.    by Fred Roberts Ragazine Music Editor Category: Best song in the highly competitive category of Hasidic surf...

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Stéphane Vereecken \ Photographer Interview

Q: When did you first realize you had creative talents as a artist?

A: I started at a very young age to no longer take Fine Arts courses and I digested all those artists who are part of the history of the Fine Arts. When I realized that one medium was not enough for me and that I needed to experience them all, I realized that I needed to say things with my art…

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Summer Take Four

        by Fred Roberts Music Editor y favorite acquisitions of the last months are quite divergent in respect to one another. There’s music from the country of Sudan (Abu Obaida Hassan). The US duo Bebe &...

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Sándor Kányádi/1929-2018

Hungarian-Romanian poet and iconic spokesman of Transylvania, Sándor Kányádi, dead at 89   by Paul Sohar Contributing Writer Sándor Kányádi (1929-2018) was born in a small Hungarian village in Transylvania, Romania, the son of a small farmer – more commonly called a...

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Gardner Dozois: In Memoriam, by Jack Dann

I don’t need to tell the reader that Gardner became one of the most important editors in the genre, as influential and essential to the mature state of science fiction as John W. Campbell was to its earlier formation. He was fine tuned to talent; he loved developing it in other writers; and that ability to nurture and develop so many writers, that ability to focus and shape the field…that was genius. Less known, sadly, is that he was a brilliant short story writer. The short form was his métier. Although he lamented that he wasn’t really comfortable with novel lengths, his oeuvre of what I think of as perfect short stories are second to none in or out of the genre. They are true expressions of the poetry that circulated through him like blood.

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Ohio Jazz Shorts/Candice Watkins

  Melvin James “Sy” Oliver: Creator of the Lunceford Sound (1910–1988), & Zach Whyte   by Candice Watkins Contributing Writer ach Whyte attended Wilberforce College in the early 1920s, where he was an early...

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William Crawford/Flash Fiction

  “It’s like a heat wave…”    A Kool, Kool Fool From The Rock ‘N Roll School Shares A Frigidaire Nightmare.   pulled into El Paso along about half past dead. The weathered wall thermometer hit 99 in the red!...

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Sue Atkinson/Old Schools, Part 2

Populism nowadays is equated in popular media with bigotry and intolerance, but in the late 19th century, the populist movement represented rural residents’ desire to shape national policy that attended to the interests of producers as well as commercial interests. After losing the battle over monetary policy, the movement dwindled, the Democratic Party turned to corporate liberalism, and farmers’ interests were abandoned.

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Steve Dalchinsky/Poetry

the stone age   i’m lost - they’ve knocked me back to the stone age - this sick skin in a dream populated by science fiction literates - this terribly lonely dream populated by people into their own heads - gin drinkers & young girls sitting around 4 legged bathtubs...

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Adele Kenny/Poetry

2 Poems by Adele Kenny   Past the Waterline (After Lake with Dead Trees by Thomas Cole) This could be any day, anywhere—either one of us could be the other, momentary deer where the water ends and the forest begins. Whatever hard things we’ve seen—what we’ve fallen...

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Fiction/Leslie Brown

  WALKABOUT   by Leslie Brown In the summer of 1969 I told my mother II was going to sublet an apartment in the Cass Corridor. I’d always wanted to live near campus, and this was my last chance, my final quarter of graduate school at Wayne State University. Mama...

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Nancy Barno Reynolds/Education

ROSS FINDON PHOTO/ Unsplash   Those Who Can, Teach: Transitioning Through Education   by Nancy Barno Reynolds Education Editor tell people I’ve been teaching for 30 years and deep down, I feel that’s my...

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Teen Pregnancy: A Nurse’s Perspective

School officials are aware of, and knowledgeable about, requirements such as those delineated by Title IX.  These requirements promote inclusiveness and help prevent discrimination – and are intended to make it less likely that a pregnant teen will drop out of school.  Why then does the trend of drop-out teen mothers persist? Why, when we know that success in life is heavily predicated on educational attainment, do I continue to have conversations like the one above?

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Playlist for Donald Trump

  TAKE TEN Category: Cheerful world invasion videos Song Title: Гуманоид (Humanioid) Artist: ГрУпА СиТрО (Group Sitro) Year: 2007 Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMkILFgEfVM Category: Songs to tango with Melania Song Title: Комарик (Mosquito) Artist: Пётр...

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Jim Palombo/Politics

Every so often the crap hits the fan. I mean it’s in the scope of my work to pay attention to and analyze a lot of what’s on our public discussion table. But with all that’s happening, with so many battle lines being drawn, there seems too much to contend with…

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Mark Levy/Casual Observer

How about this one? You can risk sudden or severe changes in mood or behavior, like feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, hyperactive, overly excited, or even suicidal, in an effort to treat what ailment? Ironically, it’s depression, and Paxil and Wellbutrin are the medications. So if you are depressed, these medications can solve your problems by provoking suicide. Logical, I think, but extreme.

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Fred’s February Playlist

Frank Nagel photo Mary Ocher, with Felix Kubin, one of Fred's February picks....   TAKE TEN     Category: Forgotten Brazilian Guitarists Song Title: Amor de Argentina Artist: Américo Jacomino Year: 1928 Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4weR4B4heQ...

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On Location/France

Andelu painter in Vallauris: When reality flies   by Jean-Paul Gavard-Perret Contributing Editor ith Andelu the space of the  the picture is decomposed as blown by a contagious  sphere of influence. The...

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Education/Nancy Barno Reynolds

Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash   Critical Literacy, Economic Growth, and the Standards Movement: Are We Speaking the Same Language?   by Nancy Barno Reynolds Education Editor he introduction of ESSA...

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Julie McCarthy/Education

Photo by Bill Wegener on Unsplash *** Uncertain Times for Diverse Learners   by Julie McCarthy couple of years ago at a New York State conference for teachers of speakers of other languages, we were told...

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Monique Gagnon German/Poetry

  Yoga: Just Follow Instructions Yoga is the blocking of mental modifications so that the seer re-identifies with the Self.  – Sage Patanjali Inhale chest arms up, Don’t think about the phone call arms down exhale, bend forward into ragdoll, the tin plane you have to...

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Meredith Cottle/Poetry

Arrhythmic Morality perhaps I was the devil all along a crumbling and shameless little fool pleading to malicious cards of chance among the dying and their reverence that you should go, my benediction stands, as you have ceased to love or ever thrive, and I have...

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Belfast Snaps by Allen Forrest

***     About Allen Forrest: Cartoonist/Illustrator. Born in Canada and bred in the U.S., Allen Forrest has worked in many mediums: computer graphics, theater, digital music, film, video, drawing and painting. You can read more about him in About Us....

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Scott Thomas Outlar/Poetry

  Center of Your Silken Den Your couch was made of velvet. Supple to the touch. I didn’t notice as my defenses went soft. Waking up, I felt the marks left by your claws. Your teeth were sharp as needles. Subtle with their sting. I should have known the invitation...

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Politics/Jim Palombo

At the core of the situation lies a simple matter of fact. We do not have clarity when it comes to our own ideological frame; in essence, we cannot easily distinguish our capitalist and democratic selves.  In this context we have never seriously engaged our citizenry in developing a critical understanding of who we are in the mix of how capitalism’s inherent elements rub-up against the principles of democracy. After all, how much time have we spent exploring the cultural instincts that have developed in the most advanced capitalist system in the world?  In other words, how have the elements of materialism, aggression, competiveness, consumption/consumerism, individualism, survival of the fittest and the overall profit motive been examined in term of our everyday existence? Furthermore, how do these same elements play out against the ideals of fairness, equality, justice and liberty that we seem to also hold dear?  And can the deep-rooted issues we are facing — war and terrorism, racial and/or gender differences, class inequality, moral/ethical behavior, politically corruption, the ineptness of our institutions, health and welfare, and even our own individual shortcomings — be adequately confronted without a realistic assessment of our capitalist and democratic character?

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Alex Wolkowicz Review/Carl Oprey

  Alex Wolkowicz:  Viscera          Artbreak Gallery New York   by Carl Oprey Contributing Arts Editor arlier this year I went to two illuminating exhibitions within a few weeks of each other. One was the...

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Henry A. Giroux/Commentary

    Gangster capitalism and nostalgic authoritarianism in Trump’s America   In one year, the Trump regime has wrought immense damage to democracy, culture and thought. But there’s new hope.   by Henry A. Giroux Contributing Editor Just one year into the Donald Trump...

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Greg Stewart – On Location/New York

Currently the circulation of Esopus is about 30,000, with readers in all 50 states and 23 countries. The very loyal base of subscribers is about 2,000. The consistent success of Esopus has been its ability to provide the readership with an eclectic mix of art, as well as the good publicity that has been following it since its early editions. It has been reviewed in The New York Times, along with many international publications which have spread it around the globe.

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Jim Palombo/Politics

“… we have an education system that seems most focused on verifying its own worth, making it ‘too busy’ to be concerned with developing ongoing, civic dialogue. (Especially in these turbulent political times, this should be a top priority, at least on par with developing technological skills.)”

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Pierre-Jean Amar / Photography Interview

My photography work recently published in L’Oeil de la Photographie is part of an older series, which I once created on the theme of “Sheet” (as in bed linens) and the body. Similar to many of my images, I show only details, not a whole body. In hindsight, I notice today that quite often I focused on the bottoms of my models!!!

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LOCAL HEROES, 2015, Hamburg

Axid Rain was my highlight of the 4th semi-final night. They call their genre flatrock, which I attempted to google but finally gave up. They’re a hard rock band, in the classic vein of MTV or Huey Lewis and the News, with a fantastic live show. Frontman Yannick Mense, in his leather hat and seaman’s jacket was all over the stage. Pure charisma and wild guitar riffs. All in all an electrifying performance.

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A New Zimbabwe

We picked up Renée, our seasoned 4×4 Toyota Prado in Lusaka, spent a day gathering supplies, and were on the road to Livingstone when we realized that we lacked enough Zambian Kwacha for the toll gates. At each town we passed, long lines stretched outside the banks and ATMs. It was two days before Christmas…

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The name Ragazine was coined in the mid-’70s in Columbus, Ohio, as the title of an alternative newspaper/magazine put together by a group of friends. It was revived in 2004 as ragazine.cc, the on-line magazine of arts, information and entertainment, a collaboration of artists, writers, poets, photographers, travelers and interested others. And that’s what it still is.

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